Creative Critical Reflection

On completion of the product, candidates must reflect upon their work, using digital formats such as director commentaries, slideshows with voiceover, podcasts, prezis or screencasts. The emphasis should be on creative use of such tools to critically reflect on the production, guided by the following compulsory questions:

1.  How does your product use or challenge conventions and how does it represent social groups or issues?
2.  How does your product engage with audiences and how would it be distributed as a real media text?
3.  How did your production skills develop throughout this project?
4.  How did you integrate technologies – software, hardware and online – in this project?

This critical reflection should be presented individually, though candidates may collaborate in the production of responses. In their critical reflection, each candidate should give a clear indication of their contribution to such collaboration to allow teachers to allocate an appropriate mark. Collaborators who worked with the candidate on creative critical reflection must be listed on the Individual Candidate Record Card under ‘other group members’.

Assesment objectives: levels for Component 1. Creative Critical Reflection

Component 1: AO2

Level 5 16–20 The application of knowledge and understanding to show how meanings are created in media products is excellent, as
demonstrated in the blog, in the finished product and in the creative critical reflection.
Level 4 12–15 The application of knowledge and understanding to show how meanings are created in media products is competent, as  demonstrated in the blog, in the finished product and in the creative critical reflection.
Level 3 8–11 The application of knowledge and understanding to show how meanings are created in media products is apparent at a satisfactory level, as demonstrated in the blog, in the finished product and in the creative critical reflection.
Level 2 4-7 The application of knowledge and understanding to show how meanings are created in media products is limited, as demonstrated
in the blog, in the finished product and in the creative critical reflection.
Level 1 1–3 The application of knowledge and understanding to show how meanings are created in media products is minimal, as demonstrated in the blog, in the finished product and in the creative critical reflection.
Level 0 0 There is no evidence of the application of knowledge and understanding.

 

Examples of answers to this kind of questions:

-on past students’ blogs:

https://mariastreang.wordpress.com/final-work-as/

https://anamariatapalaga.wordpress.com/creative-critical-reflection-as/

https://ladafranulovic.wordpress.com/category/creative-critical-reflection-as/

https://mariabega.wordpress.com/creative-critical-reflection-as/

http://media.alexhutu.ro/category/as/as_reflection/

 

-on Pinterest on “Creative Critical Reflection” board:

Follow Ana-Maria’s board Creative Critical Reflection on Pinterest.

 

Various websites and techniques you can use to show your responses to creative critical reflection or for other posts on your blog (list taken from here: http://heathenmedia.co.uk/tech/):

Emaze

http://www.emaze.com/?emazehome

 

This is another PowerPoint alternative with lots of different templates you can use to present your work.

 

An example of 1 of these templates is below:

 

Powered by emaze

Slid.es

www.slides.com

 

This is an online presentation tool that is similar to PowerPoint, however rather than just up and down you can also go sideways too making it easier to link points together.

 

An example can be seen below:

 

Powtoon

http://www.powtoon.com/

 

This animation creator is a great way to create interesting presentations for a range of different coursework tasks, you can embed the final results on your blog by exporting them to youtube and embedding them as a video.

 

See an example below:

 

Venngage.com

Venngage is a great tool for creating and publishing infographics because it’s so simple and easy to use. You can choose from templates, themes, and hundreds of charts and icons as well as uploading your own images and backgrounds, or customize a theme to suit your brand. You can animate them too!

Easel.ly

http://www.easel.ly/

This free web-based infographic tool offers you a dozen free templates to start you off, which are easily customisable.

You get access to a library of things like arrows, shapes and connector lines, and you can customize the text with range of fonts, colours, text styles and sizes. The tool also lets you upload your graphics and position them with one touch.

meals

PiktoChart

Piktochart:

 http://piktochart.com/

Piktocharts are a very visual and creative way to display data, you can use this to present your audience research data.

Survey Monkey

Survey Monkey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com

This allows you to create online surveys where you can collect information about your potential target audience, these surveys can be embedded into a blog (like below) or sent via email or facebook.

This survey software also collects and colates your data into charts and graphs for you to analyse at a later date.

 

Google Calendar

Google Calendar:

https://www.google.com/calendar

This is a useful tool to show your ability to plan your time and your organisation skills. These calendars can be embedded into your blog to show your planning easily and quickly.

A basic example of how this can look can be seen below:

TimeToast

TimeToast:

http://www.timetoast.com/

TimeToast is an interactive timeline app, this could be used to chart or plan your progress throughout your coursework project.

An example of how a TimeToast can look can be seen below:

Popplet

Popplet:

 http://popplet.com/

Popplet is another mindmap software, this one however can only be used to insert text. This could be used to create a list of initial ideas for your magazine.

You will have to convert your Popplet to an image in order to embed it in your blog as the embed option can fail on some computers.

An example of how a Popplet might look can be seen below:

Theories Revision

SpicyNodes

SpicyNodes:

http://www.spicynodes.org/

This is a mindmap software that can contain text and images. Although this software can be a little clunky at times it can use used effectively if the information is small enough, the trick is to keep your ‘nodes’ small containing a few sentences rather than paragraphs.

An example of a SpicyNode can be seen below:

Tagul

Tagul:

https://tagul.com/

Tagul is a word cloud creator, you can use this to create a visual representation of how frequently words appear in a document. This might be useful for some of your questionnaire responses.

An example of a Tagul can be seen below:

SlideShare

SlideShare:

http://www.slideshare.net/

This website can be used to upload powerpoint presentations to to allow them to be embedded in your blog posts. This is not a particularly creative piece of technology, but can be used to portray information effectively.

An example of a SlideShare can be seen below:

Bubbl.us

Bubbl.us

https://bubbl.us/

This is an online mindmap software that can contain text and images. This can be used for a variety of different tasks, however the free account will only allow you to create 3 mindmaps.

An example of how the mindmap can look can be seen below:

An explanation of how to use Bubbl.us can be found here

VoiceThread

VoiceThread:

 https://voicethread.com/

VoiceThread is an interactive tool that allows you to comment on videos and images with your voice. You can also illustrate them and label them while you are talking and providing commentary.

This tool is particularly useful when evaluating your progress, or analysing a number of different images.

A tutorial on how to use VoiceThread is below: